Crop Use / Uncategorized

Willow Harvest 2017!

One of our favourite times of year at the garden has arrived- Willow Harvest Time!

It always seems like bonus garden time- like we are getting away with something- being outdoors for a harvest in the middle of winter. Yet traditionally the willow crop comes in while the plant is dormant and rods remain flexible for use well into the springtime. We have been oddly lucky in past years with warm days more often then not for harvest times as the photo below from 2015 shows- so be prepared for anything. Tools and gloves provided, but bring your own secateurs if you have’em!img_3597

We have two sessions available:

 WILLOW ARCH WORK PARTY

Saturday January 14 10am-2pm

Free- All are Welcome

Bring a snack to share and a cup for tea.

Help bring in the  Willow crop at MOP. Learn about  coppicing methods for annual harvests,  rose twist knots for bundling, and try your hand at willow splitting. All are welcome –Dress for the weather, and plan on rain or shine! Participants can leave with a small bundle of willow for personal projects. Register here to book a space and get any last minute updates should weather be too horrific…

We also have a weekend workshop which includes a harvest day at MOP and weaving day at Trillium North

Working Willow: From Harvest to Fence and Woven Form

Sat/Sun January 21/22 (paid program with limited space)

Willow is a primary weaving crop with numerous varieties useful for many applications, and traditionally used anywhere it grows. This two-day intensive begins with the harvesting process, touches on outdoor weaving projects with living willow, and culminates in making a Catalan-style tension tray. Workshop is outdoors rain or shine, dress for the weather, tea is served. Instructor: Sharon Kallis

Saturday- at Means of Production Garden 10-am-1pm

Harvest willow in the garden. Learn about stewardship and sustainable harvest methods of pollarding and coppicing. Demonstration of planting clipped willow whips for creating woven fences and other living structures. Participants leave with a small bundle of willow for personal use.

Sunday- at Trillium North Park-  10am-1.30pm (under shelter, outdoors)

Day two involves weaving a tension tray from our local willow. Weaving experience is helpful, but not required, some hand strength is an asset. The small woven trays are beautiful and useful objects, and the method taught is based on the traditional Catalan form.

$80- EartHand existing members ( memberships no longer for sale)

$90 -non members

img_12231-agnes-willow-tension-2

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